1st Degree Perjury

First-degree perjury is a serious criminal charge. If you are facing charges of first-degree perjury you should consult with a Denver criminal defense attorney immediately.

First-degree perjury is defined by C.R.S. 18—8-502(1) which provides that a person can be charged with perjury if they:

  1. knowingly,
  2. in any official proceeding,
  3. made a materially false statement,
  4. which he [she] did not believe to be true,
  5. under an oath required or authorized by law.

First-degree perjury is a class 4 felony punishable by 2 to 6 years in prison and a fine of not more than $500,000.

Contact a Colorado criminal defense lawyer representing clients in Denver, CO today to schedule your initial consultation.

If you have been charged with first-degree perjury an experienced Denver criminal defense lawyer is essential. Get in touch with experienced Denver perjury defense attorneys Jason Savela and Ryan Dawson by filling out our online contact form or by calling (303) 856-5700.

2nd Degree Perjury.

A person can be charged with second-degree perjury if they:

1. other than in an official proceeding,
2. with an intent,
3. to mislead a public servant in the performance of his [her] duty,
4. made a materially false statement,
5. which he [she] did not believe to be true,
6. under an oath required or authorized by law.

First-degree perjury is a class 1 misdemeanor punishable by 12 to 18 months in jail and a fine of not more than $5,000.

A materially false statement is “A false assertion that affects the action, conduct, or decision of the person who receives or is intended to receive the asserted information in a manner that directly or indirectly benefits the person making the assertion.”

If you would like to schedule an initial consultation, contact a Colorado criminal defense attorney, we represent clients in Denver, Colorado, and surrounding area. The Savela Law Firm, P.C. Give us a call at (720) 821-1001 or complete our inquiry form.

Perjury cases can be defended most often on the basis of elemental defenses which usually are an argument that one of the elements simply cannot be proven by the government beyond a reasonable doubt.

Generally speaking, this is a statement that is inaccurate information given in a court proceeding intended to help the person making the statement obtain a favorable outcome. Statements during testimony in court, or on an affidavit, or any government document are examples of materially false statements.

If you have been charged with abuse of public records an experienced Denver criminal defense lawyer is essential. Get in touch with experienced Denver abuse of public records defense attorney Jason Savela by calling (720) 821-1001.